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At what point to refrigerate dough?

At what point to refrigerate dough?

Hi, I've got a question that I was hoping someone could help me out with. If I were to make dough for French bread, cinnamon rolls, etc. and were to refrigerate it overnight to cook the next day, at what point would it need to be refrigerated?

We've got a bread machine and an old farmhouse that gets cold at night, so I was thinking of making dough in the evening to bake the next morning to help warm up the house. I just made some French bread today and the process was to make the dough in the machine and when that was done take it out and let it rest for 15 minutes, then roll it out and roll it up into a loaf and let it double in size and then bake it.

I think cinnamon rolls are pretty much the same, ie take the dough out of the machine, roll it out and smear it with butter, sugar, cinnamon, etc. (I'm thinking cherry rolls would probably be pretty great), then roll it up, cut it into rolls and place rolls in a buttered baking dish. Then let rolls double in size and bake. My question is at what point during these processes would it be best to refrigerate the dough so it could be finished and baked the next day? Thanks a bunch for any help.


Pain de Mie with Condensed Milk

Pain de Mie with Condensed Milk

Recipe name

Pain De Mie

Revision

20% Wholewheat Condensed Milk

Revision notes

 

Product yield

529.00

Portions

1.00

Portion weight

529.00

Recipe's summary

Ingredient

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

100.00%

203.00

Starter (100%)

6.40%

13.00

Flour

80.00%

162.40

Milk

59.11%

120.00

Condensed Milk

32.02%

65.00

Butter

12.32%

25.00

Salt

1.48%

3.00

Wholewheat Flour

20.00%

40.60

Egg (2 Yolk and 1 Wholeegg)

49.26%

100.00

Totals

260.59%

529.00

Add here general directions for the recipe

Stage1: Levain

Ingredient used (%)

25.25%

Ingredient

Usage%

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

152.08%

26.96

Starter (100%)

100.00%

48.22%

13.00

Flour

25.25%

152.08%

41.00

Milk

18.33%

81.60%

22.00

Time required: 12:00:00

Totals

281.90%

76.00

Add here any specific directions for this stage

Stage2: Final Dough

Ingredient used (%)

79.80%

Ingredient

Usage%

Baker's %

Weight

Main ingredients

119.90%

135.11

Flour

74.75%

89.85%

121.40

Milk

81.67%

72.53%

98.00

Condensed Milk

100.00%

48.11%

65.00

Butter

100.00%

18.50%

25.00

Salt

99.97%

2.22%

3.00

Wholewheat Flour

100.00%

30.05%

40.60

Egg (2 Yolk and 1 Wholeegg)

100.00%

74.01%

100.00

From: Levain

100.00%

56.25%

76.00

Time required: 02:00:00

Totals

391.53%

529.00

Add here any specific directions for this stage

Got a question from my boss asking can sourdough be something else other than crunchy and chewy bread last week. I told her OF COZ we can sourdough can work it magic and transform a bread beyond our imagination like cake, biscuits and of coz different style of bread. Then I baked a batch of bagel and this Pain de Mie, just to show her that sourdough can be not sour and it can also be fluffy soft. 

This formula is adapted from Our well respected friend on this forum, Txfarmer, I have reduced the percentage of Condensed Milk and substituted wholewheat flour for some of the bread flour. It gives me full and complete flavor of wheat. I can proudly say that this is one of the best sandwich bread you will have. 

 

Untitled Untitled



no-knead sourdough bread with steel crust - suggestions please

no-knead sourdough bread with steel crust - suggestions please

Hello Fresh People!

I've been baking sourdough for a few years now, and have always used the knead method.  I've had good luck baking in my cast iron dutch oven and even better luck in my romertopf clay oven.  I've been looking for a sourdough that will fit my lodge 4lp loaf pan so it would be more sandwichey, and came across a no-knead recipe on sourdough international http://www.sourdo.com/recipes/no-knead-sourdough/ which has been interesting.  This might work, but it will need some tweaking for my use.  I'm hoping to get some good help from you all on here.

The recipe calls for three proofs, the first one a culture proof.  "Mix 1 cup of the fully active culture with 1 cup of flour and sufficient water to form a thick pancake batter consistency and proof it for 6 to 8 hours at 65-70oF if you prefer a mild flavor or at 75-85oF if you want it more sour."

My culture is a Carl's Oregon that has been going strong for about six months.  I take one cup of starter and feed it 1 cup of King Arthurs Bread Flour with about 1 scant cup of spring water mixed and left to bubble up for 6 to 8 hours.  I always make sure to use the start for the culture proof when it is at the top of its yeasty bubbling.  The culture proof has been nice and bubbly, lots of good gas action going on. 

The second proof is a dough proof:  "In a large bowl briefly mix the flour, culture, water and salt.  The consistency should be firm and shaggy.  Cover bowl with plastic wrap and proof over night ( 10-12 hours) at room temperature (65-70oF) for a mild flavor or at 75-80oF in a proofing box for a more sour flavor."  I leave it out on the counter overnight for the 10 to 12 hours, and it more than doubles itself.  The temp is around 76 to 77 degrees.  It goes from being a shaggy mess to a wet sticky gloppy mess.  The instructions say to flour your surface and leave the sticky dough for 15 minutes to relax the gluten, which I do, but feel is unnecessary.  

The third proof says to use enough flour to shape the dough into a boule.  I don't do that, I use enough flour to form the wet mess into a loaf the size of my Lodge LP4 Cast Iron Loaf pan, which I grease with butter or Crisco, and then leave it to rise for an hour - hour and a half, in my cold electric oven.  After the dough has risen over the pan an inch, I do the poke test and make sure the dough is springing back. I do follow the cooking instructions, which are to turn the oven on to 375 Degrees Fahrenheit and cook for an hour and ten minutes, leaving the loaf pan in the cold oven. 

I go an extra step and put several ice cubes in a cast iron corn bread skillet so that they will melt and give off humidity.  I also attempt to score the top of the loaf but it is so wet it makes no difference.  I think so far all I have done is make the dough laugh at me.  You can barely tell where I score it, there are no ears.  The surface of the loaf is not smooth at all.  But I've had great oven spring - it is doing exactly what I wanted and rising up to make a sandwich type loaf.  But the crust is a pale greige, that's the only color I can think to describe it.  It is NOT the lovely golden brown of my kneaded loaves.  The crumb is pretty good, there are some holes in it, but it is still just slightly a little gummy and for as wet as the dough is - I would have thought the holes would be a tad larger. I do check the temp before pulling the loaf out and it was 182 degrees Fahrenheit.  The crust is also so crisp you can break your teeth on it and there are no ears, no crackling crust when it is cooling on the rack.

Please post any suggestions on what to do to get a nice lovely golden shade with some good crisp ears, larger holes in the crumb and a chewy crust.  I did try one loaf at 400 degrees Fahrenheit and the color was almost perfect and it did crackle while cooling.  The crust was more chewy as well but the crumb was gummy.

I am thinking the oven needs to be hotter, but should I turn it up to 450 and then down to 400 when the oven reaches temperature, or should I just crank it up to 400 and leave it for an hour instead of an hour and ten minutes?

Any suggestions you have are appreciated!

Thanks and happy baking!

Denise in Texas

 

 



Help needed with shaping loaves please

Help needed with shaping loaves please

My loaves are misshapen. I can't get rid of of flaps that form when I shape the loaf. Please help.

Many thanks



Cadco XAF 183, Slightly used

Cadco XAF 183, Slightly used

Hello,

i posted this on craigslist also but havent sold it yet.  Im out of the country but I have the oven at my parents house.  Either one or my friends could be there to help anyone take a look at it

Im looking to get $1100.  there are numerous reviews on the Cadco oven for bread usage, im just looking geared more towards professional bread usage.  this works great for baked goods, for bread it is pretty good.  the humidity function is not steam injection, so dont expect a $50k oven steam injection.  but better than spraying water, lava rocks, ice , etc...

Comes with air deflector plate that blocks the air circulation from the convection mode, this plate can be removed and placed on any time.  Also the aluminum plate for pizzas, and hearth style breads.  Also has water hose to be connected to faucet for water humidity injection.  Cart not inlcuded.

I am in southern california. local pick up only please, unless you got a buddy that is willing to pick it up and deliver it to you.  

Check the Craigslist post for more pics!

CL post http://orangecounty.craigslist.org/app/4682867949.html



Storing sprouted grains and fresh flour

Storing sprouted grains and fresh flour

I just got the new Reinhart cookbook, Bread Revolution, and right now I'm experimenting with some of the sprouted flour recipes. I'm sprouting, drying, and grinding my own wheat flour but only as much as I need.

Since the sprouting process takes so much time, I would like to either sprout and dry a few lbs of wheat berries at a time, or grind large amounts into flour to save for later. However, I don't know if the rules of storing the grain or "aging" the flour are different for sprouted grains. 

Does anybody know what the best practices are for storing sprouted grains or freshly ground sprouted flour? Is the shelf life decreased once enzymes have been activated? Does the flour benefit from oxidation?



Forkish Pizza with Levain

Forkish Pizza with Levain

This pizza took so long to make that I can't really remember with certainty whether I used a 50/50 blend of Caputo 00 flour and White Whole Wheat flour. I blogged about it here and said it was done with All Purpose flour.  I think that is probably accurate because I was writing about it several days ago when my memory was fresher.



Getting flours and grains organized

Getting flours and grains organized

Put together a spreadsheet-type table of possible flours, grains, etc. as I want to go beyond wheat, spelt and rye. Right now, I am just looking at recipes.

Suggestions would be most welcome.

Also fantasizing about buying a mill and going off the deep end with grinding my own flours. The descriptions here and elsewhere of the taste make that a tempting way to go.

 



hand vs machine

hand vs machine

I'm new to the site and found Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye recipe-want to make this bread!  I don't have a machine/mixer and would be mixing/kneading by hand.  How will this affect the final product?  I want the holes and am worried my hands-on will over handle the bread, making it less hole-y.



Swirly Whirly SJSD

Swirly Whirly SJSD

A secret turning in us
makes the universe turn.
Head unaware of feet,
and feet head. Neither cares.
They keep turning.

Rumi - The Secret Turning

And so it came to pass that I ended up on "gardening leave" from my job, waiting for a release date so that I could start my new job.  It was, in fact, "baking leave" but only a handful of my colleagues understood this!!  On my first day home, as I tried to read through the overnight posts on TFL while recovering some sort of humanity via a cup of coffee, The Husband was wandering around the house in his sports kit, minus a sock, frantically looking for said sock, as one does.  I take comfort in the hope that I am not alone and that somewhere, out there, live many happy ladies whose beloveds run around looking in kitchen cabinets for a missing sock.  I have also wondered whether, perhaps, my parents pay The Husband a monthly stipend to do things like this.  Maybe he even has a blog somewhere called "Inexplicable Oddities and Bizarre Behaviours I have invented to drive my wife nuts".  Having duly ascertained that no stray socks lurked in our kitchen (cabinets or elsewhere), he stopped to ask me whether I really planned to spend my entire time off work making bread.   Hearing the answer, he nods briefly and says "OK.  Have you considered that you may need some form of counselling when you pick up your new job, I am worried about the withdrawal symptoms when you have to sit at your desk instead of baking…..".   It was too early for a glass of wine, so I gave him That Look and had another coffee.

I loved the SJSD so much, I wanted to try again.  Between the odd calls from "old work" and from "new work", mainly trying to find out what my news was, I pulled out my large mixing bowl and flour and set to it.  At this point, Mother calls.  After establishing that I am not at work, she offers up: "I hope you're not going to spend the whole time making bread!"  In lieu of an answer, I ask if she has been paying The Husband to do weird stuff around the house.  Silence.  More silence.  "Do you want to speak to your father?" she says.   And so, on with the SJSD.


A few small changes in the formula below, what with the Great Sock Palaver, I was distracted and added 50g each of rye and whole wheat, as opposed to 25g each.  As a result, I winged it a bit and added some more water to a total of 390g.  I also didn't have 100%n hydration levain to hand, so used the 80% hydration I had ready.

Bread Flour  450g
Rye  50g
Whole Wheat  50g
Water  390g
Salt 12g
Levain 150g (80% hydration, 50% bread flour, 50% whole wheat, 8hrs build)

1. Autolyse all flour and 350g water, 2hrs
2. Mix 40g water, 12g salt and 150g Levain
3. S&F 4 times at 30min. intervals, total time on counter is 3.5hrs
4. Cold Bulk Ferment - set in fridge for 22hrs
5. Preshape and bench rest for 20min
6. Shape and proof for a wee snippet over 1hr
7. Bake in DO, oven at 250C for 20min then reduce temp to 230C and remove lid at 25mins and continue to bake for another 15-20min

 


I got my courage together and decided to try for a swirly whirly scoring pattern, which led me to think of whirling and dervishes and therefore Rumi again, hence the turning poem.  This one was slightly more sour than my first attempt at SJSD, and again a delicious "universal" bread.  As expected, it passes The Husband test, and is declared to be tastier because it has a bit more tang.  He was terribly nice all evening, there was no mention of socks and he even offered to wash the dishes.   He got a little reward by way of a stray sock (discovered in the sock drawer, of all places), rolled up and tied with a big red ribbon, on his pillow.   

The lover's food is the love of the bread;
no bread need be at hand:
no one who is sincere in his love is a slave to existence.

Rumi - The Interest without The Capital

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