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Questions about ankarsrum mixer (aka DLX or assistent)

Questions about ankarsrum mixer (aka DLX or assistent)

Hi all,

Today I bought a brand new ankarsrum original mixer. I understand that the roller and scraper are the most useful for making bread doughs, and converting bread recipes to this mixer should be straight forward. What I am wondering about are other types of recipes. Here are my questions, and I hope I can get answers for them:

1. To make a pound cake, do I use the roller and SS bowl, or the wire cookie beaters and the plastic bowl? The cookie beaters look very flimsy tO me.

2. Can you make Italian meringue in this mixer? I am a little hesitant to pour hot sugar syrup into the plastic bowl...

3. To make choux pastry, do I use the roller or the cookie beaters? 

Thanks!



Problem with pasta dough that separates

Problem with pasta dough that separates

I normally have no problem making my pasta dough ( I usually make pasta 2-3 times/month) I use the basic pasta recipe from the King Arthur pasta class ( flour / eggs/ olive oil).  One or twice though, when I'm kneading the dough, it starts to "separate" rather than coming together.  I'm letting my dough rest right now, and I'm hoping the gluten will help have it come together before I put it through my pasta machine.  Does anyone know why this separation happens ? And if so - is there anything I can do to correct it when I notice it start to happen ?



Maple Walnut Coconut Almond Banana Vanilla Chocolate Chip Volcannoli!

Maple Walnut Coconut Almond Banana Vanilla Chocolate Chip Volcannoli!

w/Nutmeg, Cinnamon & Lemon Zest, filled w/Cannoli Cream

These Tops Are Bottoms... Again.



Bread temperature - rubbery texture

Bread temperature - rubbery texture

Hello,

I've been experimenting for the past 6 months in making bread in tropical climate (Bangkok). My favorite is baguette, made with 35% starter at 1:1 hydration, and overall 65 to 70% dough hydration. So far so good, bread has nice oven spring, good crust look and tastes good - but it's not sour at all, and the inner crumb has a much more rubbery texture than an average baguette "made in France".

I suspected that the "rubbery texture" was actually gelatinised starch rather than "normal bread", and decided to stick my digital thermometer probe inside a baguette just before cooking was done. To my great surprise, it read 99.9C (211++F). I've read in a number of places that bread is "done" when inner temperature reaches around 205-210F (96-99C), while stopping earlier around 194-205F (90-96C) would produce a rubbery texture...?

I've tried several experiments, and each time the inner temperature reaches 99C (211F) very quickly - less than 10 minutes into the baking, crust is not even colored yet. This means my dough is boiling rather than baking, which seems odd - but it would explain the gelatinised texture.

In my next experiment, I dramatically lowered the over temperature to 190C (375), attempting to compensate with a longer baking time. Bread inner temperature was already 99C within 18 minutes, while outer crust was barely shading into yellow tones. I took out the baguette after 32 minutes, crust still not quite golden brown - but the inner crumb was much nicer, springy and light, without the rubbery texture.

And yes, my thermometer is calibrated, and no I don't measure oven temperature by mistake - I take the bread out of the oven to measure it's temperature. Temp stabilizes within 5 seconds and doesn't move after that.

I would be really interested in feedback from those of you with an inclination for a scientific approach to baking:

- have you tried measuring your bread 50% into the baking? What temp do you get?

- do you see any difference between baking a thin baguette and a large loaf? (I imagine inner temperature will be lower for a loaf - but by how much?)

- if you do have a "boiling dough", do you also obtain a rubbery texture like me? (perhaps some of you like this - but it's not how bread is normally made in France...)

- if you are able to obtain a nice springy/light baguette texture, what is the inner temp at the end of the baking?

Thanks for any suggestions and advice!

Gus

 



Mid-Week Bakes

Mid-Week Bakes

Well i got a lot of free time on my hands these days.  Believe it or not I'm baking more and more at home.  Figured I'd share a couple bakes I did this week.  I had a friend pass through from NY on a vacation and had to make her some bread.  Then I had a meeting a different week and thought well I might as well make them some bread.  And so Rachael's Rye (a spin on the 20% Rye from T3) and a Semolina Porridge Bread.  Both were quite good.  The Rye is more of a multigrain than a Rye even at 20% Rye but it's quite delicious.  This one compares with the PVM as it's sweet cousin.  The semolina bread was inspired by not being able to get any Durum flour and wanting to use Semolina.  I added 10% as flour and more by making a porridge of Semolina.  Both are keepers.  Featured pic is the Rachael's Rye crumb.  

and below is the Semlina

Don't have a lot of time to post formula's right now but I'll give a quick breakdown of each.

Rachael's Rye:  7.5% Prefermented Flour (Wheat/White),

20% Whole Rye, 40% T85, 30% Bread Flour, 10% Whole Spelt, 2.5 % Salt, roughly 87% hdyration

Semolina:  40% KA Hard White Wheat, 10% Hard Red Wheat, 50% Bread Flour, 2.5% Salt, 80% hyd (pre-porridge)

Porridge 25%:  1 part semolina 4 parts liquid cooked for about 10 minutes and cooled and salted at 2%

Cheers

 

Josh



Sourdough Hot Cross Buns - 50% Whole Grain

Sourdough Hot Cross Buns - 50% Whole Grain

With hot cross buns on the bake list it has to be Good Friday.¬† Last years version lasted 11 months in the freezer having finished off the last one a month ago ‚Äď tasted great by the way.

 

This year we decided not to bake them in ramekins and bake them like cinnamon rolls, which are pretty much what they are, without the rolling and brown sugar.  We upped the whole grains to an 50% equivalent and dropped the egg

 

We were milling some multigrain flour for another bake today; the Pizza Civitavecchia, and had sifted out the hard bits averaging a 13.5 % extraction (or 37 g of hard bits for 275 g).  But our 87% extracion isn’t what anyone would call white as AP flour either.

 

We are guessing a the 50% whole grain but it has to be close.  All of the hard bits were used in the stage levain that was refrigerated for 24 hours after the 3rd feeding had risen 25%.

 

The white crosses were made from YW and White AP flour to set them off from the darker bun but, in the end, they baked up the same color just to spite Lucy and I.  We did our usual 3 sets of slaping and folding followed by 3 stets of stretch and folds all on 12 minute intervals.  We put the snockered fruits (cranberry, raisin and apricot) and the home made peel (lemon and orange) in on the 2nd S&F.

 

We then let the dough bulk ferment for 1 hour before shaping and placing the crosses on top and then regrigerating the buns overnight.  We let them come to room temperature and finish proofing on the counter before placing them in the mini oven at 450 F  with a splash of water in the botton of the g broiler pan so a little steam.

 

They baked for 8 minutes and then we took the bottom pan put and turned the oven down to 425 F and baked them until the center roll was 180 F ‚Äď it was the laggard .¬† The buns got some of the mini oven‚Äôs famous blisters and they browned up boldly.

 

They tasted just as good as they looked and we made French toast out of one of them and toasted up another with butter and minneola marmalade.  Just yummy.

 

Happy  Easter to all.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

10

0

0

10

2.88%

11% Extraction Multigrain

7

8

0

15

6.00%

AP

0

0

55

55

22.00%

15 % exraction Whole Wheat

11

11

0

22

8.80%

Water

37

37

55

129

51.60%

Total

65

56

110

231

92.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

97

38.80%

 

 

 

Water

134

53.60%

 

 

 

Hydration

138.14%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

26.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

250

100.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

250

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

2.02%

 

 

 

Water

150

60.00%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

60.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

347

 

 

 

 

Water

284

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

81.84%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

52.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

81.79%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

863

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Butter

40

16.00%

 

 

 

Sugar

40

16.00%

 

 

 

Orange and Lemon Peel

35

14.00%

Dry Weight.

 

Snockered Fruits

75

40.00%

Dry Weight.

 

Non Fat Dry Milk Powder

10

4.00%

 

 

 

Total

225

90.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/2 tsp each Cinnamon and Nutmeg

 

 

 

 

1/4 tsp each Ginger, Allspice

 

 

 

 

1/8 tsp Cloves & Cardamaon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YW cross dough was 75 g of YW, 100 g of AP

 

 

 

with 10 g of sugar and 1 g of salt.

 

 

 

 

 



Bread baskets

Bread baskets

Hello everyone.

I have a question about the bread baskets I have seen. They are used for proofing dough. Do you take the risen loaves out of the basket before baking or do you bake the loaves in the baskets? I am pretty new to bread making. Currently I am using a bread machine because I don't have the confidence to bake bread without the machine. I do make pizza dough and flat bread quiet a lot but it's hard to mess those up. I tried to bake a loaf of bread a few years ago and it was a disaster. I did learn I can make house bricks in my oven :)



Starter rises doesn't fall

Starter rises doesn't fall

Hello and thanks for everything I have gleaned by lurking !!

I am trying to do something new  after 70 years and follow directions.  My Tartine starter has been in the fridge for a month or two and I am working on renovating it for another try.  I have fed it four times at 12 hour intervals with 50 grams starter, 50 grams water, 25 grams white flour, 25 grams rye flour.

It looks gorgeously funky, triples in its allotted 12 hours....

But....I get no "fall".

I can't tell exactly what that means about the strength and condition of the starter at this point and how I should proceed, since what I have read so far seems to indicate that there is a rise and fall cycle, but I don't want to risk missing a feeding just so I can see it fall if that isn't the right 'next step'.  I'm not in any hurry, not trying to rush this. 

I've been very successful over the past few months with the WildYeast Overnight Ciabatta, so....I've got bread in the bag and bread in the freezer and can use this exactly when it is ready and not before.

Thanks in Advance.

Susan



Sacaduros

Sacaduros

I made these the other day and everyone loved them! I didn't find them too difficult considering the prize of eating them later....was well worth the effort.

Has anyone tried to make these with 100% Kamut flour? I'd be curious to hear some feedback on that.

 

Thanks!

Mark



Stretch / Slap and Fold

Stretch / Slap and Fold

I have been using stretch and fold and slap and fold for a while now . I have noticed that the dough feels and acts like it has a higher hydration then when I use to do standard kneading.  I fine I can add slightly more flour and still get a great crumb and texture. Has anyone else also notice this

.

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